Macrofungi

Covers mushrooms and other non-lichenized fungi that form multicellular fruiting bodies large enough to be seen with the unaided eye.

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103 common names
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The walnut (Gyromitra montana)
Distribution: Occurs in early summer, often near melting snowbanks.
Almond-scented waxcap (Hygrophorus agathosmus)
Distribution: Fairly common in the PNW, northern California, and the Rocky Mountains. It is less common elsewhere in North America and also occurs in Europe and Asia.
Habitat: It grows in conifer forests, particularly with spruce.
Blackening waxcap (Hygrocybe conica)
Distribution: Broad
Blushing waxcap (Hygrophorus pudorinus)
Butter waxcap (Hygrocybe ceracea)
Distribution: Northern Hemisphere
Conic waxcap (Hygrocybe conica)
Distribution: Broad
Crimson waxcap (Hygrocybe punicea)
Goblet waxcap (Hygrocybe cantharellus)
Golden waxcap (Hygrocybe chlorophana)
Golden-tooth waxcap (Hygrophorus chrysodon)
Distribution: Widespread throughout Northern Hemisphere
Grey waxcap (Hygrocybe lacmus)
Heath waxcap (Gliophorus laetus)
Distribution: Widespread in northern hemisphere.
Habitat: Damp soil among mosses and ferns, in forests and bogs.
Substrate: Soil.
Meadow waxcap (Hygrocybe pratensis)
Nested waxcap (Gloioxanthomyces nitidus)
Distribution: North America.
Russula waxcap (Hygrophorus russula)
Scarlet waxcap (Hygrocybe coccinea)
Slimy waxcap (Hygrocybe irrigata)
Snowy waxcap (Hygrocybe virginea)
Toasted waxcap (Hygrocybe colemanniana)
Violet waxcap (Hygrocybe lacmus)
Yellow waxcap (Hygrocybe flavescens)
Golden yellow waxgill (Hygrocybe ceracea)
Distribution: Northern Hemisphere
Mauve waxpore (Ceriporia tarda)
Description: Ceriporia tarda is a thin, soft, effused species, consisting of little more than a pore surface surrounded by a narrow, sterile margin. It typically grows in small patches that often coalesce to form larger fruitbodies. The color varies from cream to rose-pink, mauve or pinkish violet, becoming duller with age.
Habitat: woodland
Substrate: on the underside of fallen branches and logs
Blackening waxy-cap (Hygrocybe conica)
Distribution: Broad
Brown almond waxy-cap (Hygrophorus bakerensis)
Distribution: It is common throughout the PNW and extends into northern California (where it is less common).
Habitat: Near rotting conifer
Chanterelle waxy-cap (Hygrocybe cantharellus)
Flaky waxy-cap (Hygrophorus chrysodon)
Distribution: Widespread throughout Northern Hemisphere
Glutinous waxy-cap (Hygrophorus gliocyclus)
Golden waxy-cap (Hygrocybe flavescens)
Golden-fringed waxy-cap (Hygrophorus chrysodon)
Distribution: Widespread throughout Northern Hemisphere
Gray almond waxy-cap (Hygrophorus agathosmus)
Distribution: Fairly common in the PNW, northern California, and the Rocky Mountains. It is less common elsewhere in North America and also occurs in Europe and Asia.
Habitat: It grows in conifer forests, particularly with spruce.
Gray-brown waxy-cap (Hygrophorus calophyllus)
Ivory waxy-cap (Hygrophorus eburneus)
Distribution: Northern Hemisphere
Late fall waxy-cap (Hygrophorus hypothejus)
Habitat: Pine forest
Little brown waxy-cap (Cuphophyllus recurvatus)
Distribution: North America
Habitat: Grassy areas and under conifers.
Substrate: Soil.
Meadow waxy-cap (Hygrocybe pratensis)
Mt Baker waxy-cap (Hygrophorus bakerensis)
Distribution: It is common throughout the PNW and extends into northern California (where it is less common).
Habitat: Near rotting conifer
Olive-brown waxy-cap (Hygrophorus hypothejus)
Habitat: Pine forest
Orange-brown waxy-cap (Gliophorus laetus)
Distribution: Widespread in northern hemisphere.
Habitat: Damp soil among mosses and ferns, in forests and bogs.
Substrate: Soil.
Parrot waxy-cap (Gliophorus psittacinus)
Description: Glutinous or slimy green cap and stem when young. Cap margin striate. Gills waxy, well-spaced, and green when young. Cap ages to red, pink, yellow, or tawny. Stem ages to yellow or orange.
Distribution: Widespread in northern hemisphere.
Habitat: Damp forests, woodlands, pastures, roadsides.
Substrate: Soil
Pink waxy-cap (Hygrophorus erubescens)
Pointed waxy-cap (Hygrocybe cuspidata)
Purple-red waxy-cap (Hygrophorus purpurascens)
Righteous red waxy-cap (Hygrocybe coccinea)
Rockies waxy-cap (Hygrophorus saxatilis)
Russula-like waxy-cap (Hygrophorus russula)
Salmon waxy-cap (Hygrocybe pratensis)
Scarlet waxy-cap (Hygrocybe coccinea)
Scarlet waxy-cap (Hygrocybe punicea)
Smoky waxy-cap (Hygrophorus camarophyllus)
Snowy waxy-cap (Hygrophorus borealis)
Sooty brown waxy-cap (Hygrophorus camarophyllus)
Sordid waxy-cap (Hygrophorus sordidus)
Distribution: Uncommon
Spruce waxy-cap (Hygrophorus pudorinus)
Subalpine waxy-cap (Hygrophorus subalpinus)
Turpentine waxy-cap (Hygrophorus pudorinus)
Violet-gray waxy-cap (Hygrocybe lacmus)
White alpine waxy-cap (Hygrophorus subalpinus)
Bitter webcap (Cortinarius infractus)
Blood-red webcap (Cortinarius neosanguineus)
Blue-foot webcap (Cortinarius glaucopus)
Blushing webcap (Cortinarius cyanites)
Bruising webcap (Cortinarius purpurascens)
Description: Cortinarius purpurascens has a viscid ocher-brown to red-brown or darker brown cap with a violet stipe and gills, and a bulbous base with a rim; in our region, it is most commonly found along the coast, especially with Sitka spruce.
Cinnamon webcap (Cortinarius cinnamomeus)
Contrary webcap (Cortinarius variicolor)
Copper-red webcap (Cortinarius cupreorufus)
Deadly webcap (Cortinarius rubellus)
Earthy webcap (Cortinarius hinnuleus)
Gassy webcap (Cortinarius traganus)
Distribution: Broad
Habitat: Abundant in the far-western mountane and boreal regions, but is much less frequent in the Rocky Mountains.
Goatcheese webcap (Cortinarius camphoratus)
Description: Cortinarius camphoratus is a completely blue-violet species with a very strong disagreeable odor, not unlike rotting potatoes.
Goldband webcap (Cortinarius gentilis)
Distribution: Broad
Habitat: C. gentilis has a broad ecological range, occurring in moist environments as well as drier, upland conifer sites. During the summer in the western mountains it can be very common, often fruiting in groups, sometimes from well rotted woody debris.
Hoary webcap (Cortinarius laniger)
Distribution: Widespread, but variable in its fruiting, in some years being rather common and in others being absent.
Habitat: C. laniger is characteristic of boreal and montane conifer forests.
Honey webcap (Cortinarius talus)
Habitat: Subalpine forests
Incense webcap (Cortinarius subtortus)
Orange webcap (Cortinarius mucosus)
Description: Cortinarius mucosus has a white stipe that most frequently occurs with pines.
Habitat: Pines
Pearly webcap (Cortinarius alboviolaceus)
Sepia webcap (Cortinarius decipiens)
Silky webcap (Cortinarius evernius)
Slimy webcap (Cortinarius mucifluus)
Habitat: Moist conifer forests
Stout webcap (Cortinarius crassus)
Tawny webcap (Cortinarius callisteus)
Violet webcap (Cortinarius violaceus)
Distribution: In some years it is difficult to find but in general it is commonly encountered, but usually in small numbers.
Habitat: Widespread in older forests in PNW region, but much less common in the interior mountains than nearer the coast.
Woolly webcap (Cortinarius laniger)
Distribution: Widespread, but variable in its fruiting, in some years being rather common and in others being absent.
Habitat: C. laniger is characteristic of boreal and montane conifer forests.
Weeping-widow (Lacrymaria lacrymabunda)
Wet-rot (Coniophora puteana)
Wine-cap (Chroogomphus vinicolor)
Pale winey-base (Ramaria vinosimaculans)
Yellow winey-base (Ramaria rubiginosa)
Woman-on-motorcycle (Leucoagaricus leucothites)
Habitat: It is a widespread mushroom that occurs mostly in grassy areas, gardens, and other human-influenced habitats, but also occasionally in forests.
Green wood-cups (Chlorociboria aeruginascens)
Distribution: Broad Across North America, Europe, and Asia
Spores: spores (5--8 x 1--2 ┬Ám)
Wood-ear (Auricularia auricula)
Gelatinous woodcrust (Phlebia tremellosa)
Habitat: mainly a fall fungus and occurs on stumps, logs, and woody debris of both hardwoods and conifers
Clustered woodlover (Hypholoma fasciculare)
Distribution: Common in PNW
Habitat: Grows in clusters on logs and other large woody debris.
Smoky-gilled woodlover (Hypholoma capnoides)
Distribution: It occurs thoughout the PNW, elsewhere in northern North America, and in Europe and Asia.
Habitat: Grows on conifer logs.
Almond woodwax (Hygrophorus agathosmus)
Distribution: Fairly common in the PNW, northern California, and the Rocky Mountains. It is less common elsewhere in North America and also occurs in Europe and Asia.
Habitat: It grows in conifer forests, particularly with spruce.
Blotched woodwax (Hygrophorus erubescens)
Gold flecked woodwax (Hygrophorus chrysodon)
Distribution: Widespread throughout Northern Hemisphere
Ivory woodwax (Hygrophorus eburneus)
Distribution: Northern Hemisphere
Matt woodwax (Hygrophorus penarius)
Rosy woodwax (Hygrophorus pudorinus)
Wood woolly-foot (Gymnopus peronatus)
Distribution: G. peronatus is a widespread and often extremely abundant species at lower elevations in the PNW, occurring in mixed woods on leaf litter and woody debris.
Spores: long and narrow and the edges of the gills have long, slender cheilocystidia
Woolly-stem (Agaricus subrutilescens)
Description: Agaricus subrutilescens is a highly esteemed edible mushroom although, like most agaricuses, it is not for everyone. It is a tall statuesque forest-dweller, with a whitish cap overlain with purplish brown fibrillose scales, shaggy white stipe, and persistent, but not especially heavy, skirt-like ring. The flesh is whitish, non-staining, and has a mild odor. The gills are whitish at first, then turn pale pinkish, and finally chocolate-brown. It is not uncommon, but usually does not occur in large numbers. If not restricted to the Pacific Coast, at least it is most common here.
Woollycap (Suillus tomentosus)
Distribution: Very common and abundant in the PNW.
Habitat: S. tomentosus occurs primarily under lodgepole and shore pines.